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What You Should And Should Not Wear In The Office During Summer

June 21st, 2017 | Posted by ATS in HR | Leave Management | Productivity | Time and Attendance Canada | Time and Attendance Toronto - (Comments Off on What You Should And Should Not Wear In The Office During Summer)

Every year summer along comes summer with its high temperatures, and we all scramble for our shorts, tank-tops and other casual wear, but not wearing the right clothes in the office can send the wrong message. Many of today’s technology organizations tend to be more relaxed about employee work attire and it’s not unusual to see employees wearing jeans and tee-shirts at these companies. And, although this is usually a happy time, you should still be cautious about what you choose to wear during summer in the office.

What You Should And Should Not Wear In The Office During Summer

In a Career Builder article, summer attire taboos, here are 8 tips for maintaining your business-casual and/or professional look during those hot days.

  1. Flip-flops
    Professional or dressy sandals are acceptable in many workplaces, and you know better than anyone if you work in such a place. Flip-flops and other recreational footwear are rarely acceptable for the same reason blowing a bubble with gum in a meeting is inappropriate: You look out of place and inconsiderate to your audience. Plus, that annoying sound of the flip-flop slapping against your heel will not make you any friends.
  2. Sunglasses indoors
    You’re not Bono. Yes, the sunlight is blinding when you walk outside or drive to work, but sunglasses don’t belong indoors. People can’t tell if you’re paying attention to them when your eyes are hidden behind dark lenses, and everyone will wonder if your pupils were just dilated.
  3. Shorts
    Shorts automatically take the professional image down a notch, which could be a good thing for some places. For example, if you walk into a store that sells surfboards and wetsuits, you want to be greeted by someone in shorts and a tee, not a suit and briefcase. In most workplaces, however, shorts detract from a professional demeanor. Even nice shorts that are more suited for a day the country club than an afternoon painting your kitchen aren’t as pulled together as a pair of trousers.
  4. Tank tops
    Regardless of the season, you should be wary of showing too much skin. In the summer, tank tops are prevalent in many wardrobes, and you might be tempted to sport one to work. Don’t. From an aesthetic standpoint, tanks make people think of a six-pack of beer, not of a six-figure salary. A professional look should lean more toward the latter.
    Another issue that exists in some organizations is the idea that no one, male or female, should have bare arms. Remember when Michelle Obama took flak for her sleeveless blouses? As with many of these tips, use your best judgment. Unless your occupation involves some form of labour where sleeves affect your work, you should keep your upper arms covered.
  5. Funny shirts or shirts from your vacation destination
    Your “I’m Not as Think as You Drunk I Am” shirt might make your best friends laugh, but your boss, colleagues and customers or clients will disagree. Clothing shouldn’t announce itself, so steer clear of humor. And shirts bearing the name of your last vacation destination will probably make your overworked colleagues begrudge your time off.
  6. Not being prepared
    Even if you’re allowed to be casual during the summer, have a backup outfit or piece of clothing to dress up your attire. If you’re in jeans and a plain T-shirt and your biggest client calls a last-minute meeting, it wouldn’t hurt to have a least a blazer or nicer shirt on hand. Being prepared is never a bad thing.
  7. Anything see-through
    Another tip that should go without saying, but just in case: Skin and undergarments should not be seen through the fabric you’re wearing. Lightweight linen that’s breezy and comfortable on the beach is inappropriate at work, not to mention uncomfortable for your co-workers.
  8. Testing the limits
    If your employer gives you wiggle room with the dress code by using words such as “appropriate” and “reasonable” to describe acceptable attire, use your brain. A ketchup-stained T-shirt, scandalously short shorts and dilapidated tennis shoes are acceptable in your personal life, but not at work. And you know that. So don’t ruin summer wardrobes for everyone.

Most people are happy during summer after the dark months of fall and winter. However, you should always make sure do not go more casual than your company culture allows. And, when in doubt, look around you and observe how other people are dressing. If you are still not sure and your company does have an employee handbook, ask your boss or the company’s HR manager.