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Embracing Tech Buzz Words In The World Of HR

October 4th, 2018 | Posted by ATS in Artificial Intelligence | Cloud Computing | ERP | Google | HR | Labour Analytics | Time and Attendance Blog, Workforce Management Software - (Comments Off on Embracing Tech Buzz Words In The World Of HR)

If you are in HR, you are likely familiar with a variety of buzz words, especially, when it comes to technology and the many applications that are available in the market, to complement your business processes.

Below is a list of such buzz words that most if not all in HR, is familiar with by now. This list was first compiled by Sharlyn Lauby, of HR Bartender and regenerated by HumanResources Online.

Artificial intelligence (AI): From google maps to spam fillers, AI brings convenience and helps people fulfill their career ambitions. The future trend is to scale their efforts and bring consistency to their activities. Programming is out of the question, but HR leaders need to know enough to guide the conversation within employees and make the best decisions for the company.

Embracing Tech Buzz Words In The World Of HR

Boolean Search: This is a method for searching websites to limit the results by defining the relationships between key words. With all the new fancy search engines, fundamental tools such as Boolean Search can not be ignored by HR professionals. Google search is focused on recent results. Refining Boolean Search skills can quickly access information from any database of software. The must-know Boolean operators are SITE, INURL, AND, OR, NOT.

Machine Learning: Machine learning is quickly becoming an important data tool for HR professionals. What is it and how does it differ from artificial intelligence?

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) ERP is the successor of materials resource planning which is described as a combination of manufacturing, financial and materials management software functionality. Human resources, professional services and customer relationship management functions are added to ERP. ERP can go beyond the common benefits. It can use analytics to reduce workforce attrition, and therefore better target talent.

The Internet of Things (IoT): The Internet of Things – or IoT – is the latest technology term for HR pros. It’s all about connectivity but it’s much more than that.

Search engine optimization (SEO): SEO is a practice of improving the visibility and ranking of a website in the search engine. It is no longer only useful for marketing professionals. It is also crucial for HR professionals to minimise their talent acquisition efforts since more and more candidates are using major search engines for job searches. Mobile-optimised career microsites are becoming an important part of companies’ SEO strategies.

Software-as-a-Service (SaaS): SaaS is any software paid for through a subscription or licence rental that does not require one to download it onto a computer. SaaS is easily confused with the term “cloud”, which refers only to computing resources such as data storage, virtual servers or networks which are only accessible for the information technology departments.

In the end, some buzz words simply go out of fashion or are so over-used, that we get tired of them, and so just stop using them altogether.

There is a growing body evidence that shows that the adoption of; cloud computing, machine learning and artificial intelligence is on pace to grow exponentially over the next 10 years and beyond. And, yet there still some resistance to embrace this type of technology. Many of today’s leaders understand the difference between staying put or adapting to achieve business success.

Automation’s Biggest Enemy: Cultural Resistance is the title of an article published by Industry Week that delves into the resistance, which in turn, prevents some companies from adopting artificial intelligence and reaping its benefits. It reads in part;

“While customers perceive that artificial intelligence (AI) will allow brands to deliver what they want when they want it, there remains a widespread lack of understanding among enterprises of the potential benefits for AI to solve real-world business problems. The biggest corporate challenge to implementing an intelligent business strategy is cultural resistance (49%), according to a new research report, “AI2020: The Global State of Intelligent Enterprise” by IQPC’s Intelligent Automation Network.

What’s Behind The Resistance To Artificial Intelligence?

Some of today’s forward-thinking companies understand the power of cloud computing and its impact on cost containment and have embraced business applications— like time and attendance, that has embedded artificial intelligence. For example, ATS TimeWork OnDemand was expressly designed with this mind— this robust application will propel your business operations and help your company keep pace with advance in technology.

The Industry Week article goes on to say; “AI will automate some jobs, particularly the dirty, dangerous, or dull work that people don’t want to do – everything from sewer reconnaissance to repetitive factory work. The skills needed for future employment include critical thinking and problem solving, good communication and teamwork, leadership, initiative, creativity and the willingness to leverage the current technology”.

In other words, artificial intelligence is not here to replace your job— it will help you do your job better.

To learn more, ATS TimeWorkOnDemand embedded artificial intelligence, go to our website.

 

When Hiring Employees Avoid These Blunders

August 1st, 2017 | Posted by ATS in Artificial Intelligence | HR | Recruitment - (Comments Off on When Hiring Employees Avoid These Blunders)

Hiring employees takes a certain type of skill that not many people possess. Some individuals can spot talent immediately, while others rely on recruitment software to help them choose the right candidate.  But does this mean that the hiring process can be subjective? In many ways, yes it is.  When you consider the many variables that must be taken into account when selecting candidates (personal biases being one of the biggest) it’s unlikely that the person doing the hiring will not be affected by his/her personal views, and experience during the interview process.

In her article for ERE MEDIA Top 10 Hiring and Recruiting Blunders by Employers Robin Shea, cautions, that “employers’ recruiting and hiring processes are fraught with legal risks” especially, if you are not aware of the potential landmines that you could step on, while going through the process.

We rearranged the order of those blunders and made a list 5:

Failure to hire the best person for the job: It’s easier to say “thanks, but no thanks” to a bad candidate than to say “you’re fired” to a bad employee. Failures to hire are also generally easier to defend than decisions to fire. So try to put all that nepotism, favoritism, prejudice, and concern about “connections” aside, and choose the individual who seems to have the best education, experience, and ability to perform the job. You can even consider whether the candidate “plays well with others” if you want.

Recruiting or hiring employees using “coherent people profiles” assembled by aggregators like Spokeo:   Spokeo was fined $800,000 in 2012 by the Federal Trade Commission because it gathered all kinds of data about individuals — including race, ethnic background, religion, economic status, and age ranges — and sold the information to employers who used it in making recruiting and hiring decisions.

When Hiring Employees Avoid These Blunders

Use of pre-employment tests that don’t comply with the law: Of course, in the overwhelming majority of jobs, it is flat-out illegal to require a physical or psychological examination before a conditional offer of employment has been made. Other testing — for example, “personality” tests designed to measure honesty and work ethic, “intelligence” tests, or “skills” tests — may be all right, but be careful even with these.

Committing an EEO faux pas in the job interview: Have you ever done this or seen it being done? Asking female candidates (but not male) about their childbearing plans and day care arrangements. Asking minority candidates (but not “majority”) whether they have reliable transportation. Bragging about your “young, high-energy” workforce, which is generally recognized as “code” for age discrimination. Asking candidates about their physical health or fitness, or where they go to church. (Not even where they “worship”!) Telling sexual, racial, ethnic, or religious jokes in the interview.

Failure to involve Human Resources in the recruiting and hiring process: “Oh, but HR is such an obstacle!” Yes, and you should be grateful. Think of HR as your Jiminy Cricket: HR is trying to save you from potentially devastating class action lawsuits and expensive settlements of adverse impact/failure-to-hire claims.

It is hard to believe that some companies today, go through these blunders. It is equally naïve to believe they don’t. And as the process of hiring becomes more efficient, data-driven, and automated by AI and technology, companies need to be more vigilant in ensuring that they are keeping up with the workforce compliance in the jurisdiction in which they operate.

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