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A Bad Hire Can Be Costly, Here Are Some Tips That Can Help You Avoid This

October 10th, 2018 | Posted by ATS in Career | HR | Recruitment | Talent Management | Time and Attendance Blog, Workforce Management Software - (Comments Off on A Bad Hire Can Be Costly, Here Are Some Tips That Can Help You Avoid This)

No HR professional or company executive wants to hire the wrong person yet every company has done exactly that at one point or another. And if your company is a very successful one do you have time to use the proper metrics to help you avoid the costly mistake of a bad hire?

A Bad Hire Can Be Costly, Here Are Some Tips That Can Help You Avoid This

In her article 3 Common Hiring Mistakes New Managers Should Avoid for the Harvard Business Review Whitney Johnson offers some solid tips on how companies can avoid bad hires. They include:

“If only I could clone myself.” Lauren Rivera, a researcher from Northwestern, told me via email, “what most people are looking for is ‘me.’” Her studies concluded that “interviewers who lacked systematic measures of what their company was looking for tended to fall back on themselves and defining merit in “their own image,” meaning that the most qualified interviewees were those who best resembled their interviewers.” It’s easy to want to make this kind of hire — a carbon copy of yourself. But they will be bored and frustrated quickly because there’s no headroom for them to grow and advance. You already have you and don’t need another you.

“If only I could find someone to do all the annoying stuff that I don’t want to do.” This impulse, while understandable, is an even more dangerous one. Sure, it is tempting to avoid the responsibilities you find tedious or challenging. But you’ll have trouble attracting talented people to a job that’s mostly boring work. If you want to off-load everything that you detest doing, mostly junk work, it’s likely you’ll disrespect the person you’ve hired to be your dumping ground (a sentiment they will be inclined to return).

“If only I knew how to do that.” There may be tasks that demand attention but you don’t personally have the expertise to complete them. You value this skill in other people, and it’s what you’re looking for in a new hire. But there can be a couple of pitfalls with thinking this way. Sometimes, there’s an undercurrent of envy — you may feel threatened because they have talents you lack. Or you may put them on a pedestal — we do this all the time when we say we want to hire a “unicorn” or a “ninja.” Either way, you risk overpaying financially — and emotionally. Not only that, if you don’t understand the work they are doing, you may not have a clear sense of what path this person needs to be on to maximize their talent and overall productivity.

Bottom-line-every company will or have had an occasional bad hire or two, the trick is to make sure it’s not a consistent pattern.

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What Is The Point Of Ghosting Potential Candidates Anyway?

September 18th, 2018 | Posted by ATS in Careers | HR | Recruitment | Time and Attendance Blog, Workforce Management Software - (Comments Off on What Is The Point Of Ghosting Potential Candidates Anyway?)

The practice of ghosting in the world of work equates to some recruiters leaving job candidates guessing whether they are going to be hired or not, because the recruiter, has decided its best to simply ignore the candidate’s emails or phone calls. In other words, the candidate will eventually get the message that the company is not interested in their services. Wow! Who would want to work for company like that?

What Is The Point Of Ghosting Potential Candidates Anyway?

Of course, this worked well for the companies that employed this practice, for several years, until, the workforce demographic started to change with millennials, turning the tables on some companies and started doing the ghosting themselves.

In Riia O’Donnell article, Are your applicants ghosting you? Written for HR Dive succinctly describes this phenomenon. It reads in part;

“Ghosting has come full-circle. Dozens of websites are devoted to the complaints of candidates who’ve been ghosted by employers — never receiving acknowledgement for their application, no callback after an interview, being left hanging for a hiring decision. And now employers are seeing the same actions (or non-actions) taken against them.

Recruiters who hire for almost every level of employee, from entry-level to management, are experiencing the phenomenon. It runs the gamut from applicants who never respond to initial calls; those who miss interview appointments; candidates who hem and haw over offers, promising to ‘get back to you soon’ with an answer; and those who simply vanish off the face of the earth, never reporting for their first day on the job.In relationship-speak, ghosting is clear: no response is the response. As the market tightens, with competition getting even more fierce, ghosting may be a new paradigm.

How common is ghosting? The phenomenon may be learned behavior from when employers would ghost candidates. It may be that some candidates and employees believe its acceptable business etiquette. In a recent piece, LinkedIn suggested ghosting may be partly due to inexperience. Younger workers who aren’t accustomed to multiple job offers may simply not know how to say no politely and professionally.

To save time, some recruiters are starting to act like doctors or airlines, LinkedIn said — double booking interview slots, particularly for entry-level openings, in anticipation that up to half the candidates will no show. Others recommend hiring managers remain in a continuous recruitment mode to adjust for those who will walk off the job without notice. This, of course, could lead to more candidates being held at bay, which of course could lead to them believing they’ve been ghosted: bad manners coming full circle.

At its core, ghosting is a lack of communication. To minimize the chances of it happening at your company, it’s important to communicate in a way that invites job seekers and employees to be forthright. If a candidate can’t make the interview or won’t accept the offer, a recruiter can let them know he or she understands, but that the company would appreciate the honesty and professionalism of an upfront word. Another tack may be to gently let candidates know they would be eliminated from consideration for any future openings if they failed to make the interview or accept an offer without notification.

Bottom line: Job hunting is hard work and recruiters and hiring professionals alike should do a better job of communicating with job seekers. And, job seekers are not innocent themselves, since some of also practice ghosting. In the end, no one wins when both sides engage in the practice of ghosting each other.

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If You Are Job Hunting In 2018, Here Is How The Market Has Changed

February 8th, 2018 | Posted by ATS in Artificial Intelligence | Careers | HR | Recruitment | Talent Management | Time and Attendance Blog, Workforce Management Software - (Comments Off on If You Are Job Hunting In 2018, Here Is How The Market Has Changed)

In today’s world of job hunting the old ways of finding a job no longer works. Of course, we are not referring to automatically getting to the front of the line and being offered a job without so much as an interview, if you know the right people.

If You Are Job Hunting In 2018, Here Is How The Market Has Changed

Whether you are tepidly testing the job market for the first time or have been actively searching for the last several months, here are 5 tips for today’s job seekers, from a blog, written by Julianna Lopez for Business News Daily magazine.

“1. AI is changing the future of work
This should come as no surprise, but AI and automation stand to make a huge impact in nearly every facet of the workforce, but most especially in human resources and finance.

  1. Mobile job applications are getting a modern overhaul
    If you’ve applied for jobs recently, then you know that most application processes and tracking systems seem like relics from the Stone Age, which often make applying for jobs from mobile devices incredibly frustrating. Mobile apply is due for a serious and complete overhaul in 2018. Unfortunately, it will probably take a while for us to see the end results.
  2. Healthcare, tech and labor-intensive roles will grow
    Job creation in 2018 is being driven not only by continuous tech innovations, which will also continue to expand into non-tech industries, but also by significant demographic shifts as well. Many traditional jobs that can’t be easily automated in the near future – such as restaurant waiters, construction workers, and truck drivers – will continue to grow and be a significant source for jobs.
  3. The application and interview process will become increasingly transparent
    While workplaces have strived to increase transparency over the last couple of years, the online job application process remains clear as mud. In 2018, job seekers can expect increased visibility in the application process with real-time application status updates.
  1. Employees will be encouraged to explore their passions through role experimentation

To help reduce turnover and better match proven talent with the most productive roles, more and more companies are looking to create ways to support employee aspirations outside vertical trajectories through role experimentation. This establishes clearer pathways for internal lateral job moves that tap into employees’ changing skills and passions”

Searching and applying for jobs is very different from even 5 years ago. The days of walking into an organization to hand in your resume, is as archaic, as using paper time sheets to track employees time. Most if not all job searches today, happens in an electronic format. If you use some of all of the 5 tips mentioned above, your chances of getting hired will increase exponentially.

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Today’s HR managers are embracing automation, because they know it will help them improve workforce productivity reduce the amount of time it takes to process payroll, count employee hours, recruit and retain talent. Debating the benefits of business process automation is akin to asking, why do we need to use smartphones in this digital era?

In an article titled Why Automating HR Technology Is Key to Keeping Up Rick Goad presents a strong business case about the importance of HR automating its business processes. He writes in part;

“For years, HR technology was used to support and manage mundane back office paper processes and to ensure HR regulations and payroll laws were being met. More recently these platforms have shifted focus to better support talent acquisition and retention. A new generation of employees is entering the workforce with well-defined expectations of how they will interact with employers. HR technology is leading digital transformation in creating a new onboarding culture along with new ways to attract and engage talent.

HR Wants To Automate Your Business Process, Shouldn’t You Want The Same?

How much easier would it be if you could automatically generate visual process diagrams, complete documentation, and materials for compliance and training? Automation can deliver these benefits in a fraction of the time we’re used to with manual or legacy approaches. Consider the impact of faster testing and better automation coverage. How could that speed projects, reduce production downtime, and give executives peace of mind knowing a multi-million-dollar technology package is going to work the way it’s expected?

With end-to-end automation, companies can be sure HR processes operate without disruption. This is true even when it comes to frequent changes in intricate approval chains, tax calculations, employee benefits, withholding classes, payroll and more. And, because these business processes are tested and can easily generate documentation, companies can verify they are meeting compliance requirements.

For example, accurate, effective payroll operations depend on end-to-end business processes executed across HR apps, and the other applications in a company’s landscape. Today’s technology can automatically capture these as-is business processes to provide visuals and documentation for insight and improvement. Captured processes are used to create an automated regression test library that can be continuously run to validate that mission-critical end-to-end processes are functioning as designed. This eliminates delays and mitigates the risks that come with packaged applications the business depends on.”

The larger question about HR and automation is no longer when is your company going to adopt it, but instead why haven’t you?

To learn about ATS HR Software and our complementary TimeWork OnDemand App go to our website. And, while you are there, you can also register for one of our bi-monthly webinars, download brochures or request a product demonstration.

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Can You Attest To Having A Perfect Hiring Record?

November 8th, 2017 | Posted by ATS in Careers | HR | Leave Management | Recruitment | Time and Attendance Blog, Workforce Management Software - (Comments Off on Can You Attest To Having A Perfect Hiring Record?)

Seasoned HR executives will never attest to having a perfect hiring record. Why? Because no company has this record and if they claim that they do, they likely have a long nose.

Sharlyn Lauby is a highly regarded and well sought-after HR consultant and leads the HR bartender site. In one of her latest blogs what’s your Hiring Nightmare Story offers five tips that can be used by new and seasoned and HR managers alike.

Can You Attest To Having A Perfect Hiring Record?

Those five tips include:

  1. Establish selection criteria. It’s so much easier to take a few moments on the front end to discuss selection criteria than to find out after a whole bunch of interviews that the hiring manager isn’t on the same page. When an opening occurs, buy your hiring manager a cup of coffee and discuss the KSAs for the job and a sourcing strategy.
  2. Ask good interview questions. This applies to everyone in the process. Interviewing is hard. Managers who haven’t interviewed for a while might want a refresher (and they could be reluctant to ask for one). Have some pre-designed interview questions ready to help managers out.
  3. Get multiple people involved. I believe it doesn’t help employees if the only two people they know on Day One is HR and their manager. Yes, more interviews take extra time but they also allow employees to start building relationships. Exactly what they need to be successful.
  4. Don’t rush the process. The hiring process can’t drag along either. But I’ve seen plenty of managers speed up the process and make bad hiring decisions because they felt that they were racing the clock. Adding a couple of days to get the right candidate makes sense for all.
  5. And conduct a comprehensive background screening. Once you find a great candidate, verify their background. Instead of thinking that background checks are to catch deception, consider it as confirming what’s already been discussed.

Those are all useful tips and while they are not perfect (nothing ever is) following them could help your hiring averages of candidates within your company. And, the best part is that these hiring tips are free of charge.

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What Is The Right Fit Anyway?

October 2nd, 2017 | Posted by ATS in HR | Recruitment | Time and Attendance Blog, Workforce Management Software - (Comments Off on What Is The Right Fit Anyway?)

That’s a tough one to wrap around one’s head when a company says they are looking for the ‘right fit’? What’s the hidden meaning behind these words and will your company know the ‘right fit’ when you see it and if so, what does it represent? Some have argued that these words mean some companies are only interested in hiring candidates who attended the same schools or have the same circle of friends and/or associates as their current employees. If that’s the case, why not say so, on these job applications?

What Is The Right Fit Anyway?

In her article, Hiring Fit vs. Hiring for Inclusion: Which Route Should You Take?

Lin Grensing-Pophal writes, “HR professionals are talking a lot about “hiring for fit,” and the concept seems sound. After all, to create and maintain a strong corporate culture, companies would seem well-served to ensure that new hires will fit into that culture. But is there a flip side to this commonly held wisdom? Could building a culture based on “fit” keep out those who are different in some way? Does it create equal employment opportunity risks? Are innovators being excluded? How can HR leaders help their companies find the right balance?”

The importance of preserving culture within an organization is at times, nothing more than a load of baloney. Progressive organizations are that the ones who are who are diverse in thought and people. The words ‘right fit’ are embraced by some companies, thereby limiting their own growth prospects simply to attract candidates who think like them.

In closing, Lin Grensing-Pophal’s article, in SHRM, contains 6 tips for companies who hire based on ‘fit’:

  • Hire from the broadest pool of applicants. Go beyond recruiting from the same education programs. Go beyond word-of-mouth hires.
  • Use neutral job descriptions focusing on the essential job requirements and the requisite merit, education and skills needed for each position.
  • Identify the company’s core values and how a person who is a strong cultural fit best represents these values.
  • Have a wide panel of interviewers from a variety of backgrounds interview job candidates.
  • Focus on what the individual will be able to bring to the company based on his or her experience and how that will advance the company’s goals, mission, sales and success.
  • Make inclusion a goal during the onboarding process.

Apex Time Solutions (ATS) is the global leader in delivering workforce management solutions in the cloud. Thousands of organizations that spans Canada, South America, US and Europe— including Fortune 500® — companies use ATS TimeWork OnDemand to control payroll costs, minimize compliance risk, and improve workforce productivity.

To learn about ATS best-in-class time and attendance solutions, job costing, employee scheduling, forecasting, payroll and workforce analytics management go to www.atimesolutions.com

 

6 Tips To Ace Your Phone Interview

September 26th, 2017 | Posted by ATS in Careers | HR | Productivity | Recruitment - (Comments Off on 6 Tips To Ace Your Phone Interview)

Many of today’s companies are now using telephone interviews for the hiring process. It’s often used as a way to gauge a prospective candidate’s interest and also figure out if there is a fit before conducting a face-to-face interview. In some cases, the telephone interview will be one of several interviews a candidate will need to go through before they are hired by a company.

Telephone interviews are also used by companies as a way to screen applicants, and if you don’t make it past the telephone interview, chances are, you won’t be invited for another one. In her most recent article, The HR Digest Presenting tips for phone interview with a step-by-step guide Diane Booker offers some wonderful advice for would-be job seekers on the best approach to you use when doing a phone interview.

Here are those 6 tips to help you ace that interview

Step 1: a heads-up about the company
Irrespective of the nature of the job interview, it is necessary for the candidate to do his research. You must have enough knowledge about the company and what kind of services it offers. Read about the company in such a manner that you get an idea of the kind of duties you will be assigned according to your job profile.

Step 2: make notes
When we have a face-to-face interaction with a person, we pay more attention to the conversation and have our doubts clarified accordingly. While on a telephonic conversation, we might miss out on some factors. This is why it is important to jot down a list of questions you would like to ask the employer beforehand. Such a practice is to avoid any misconceptions and to make sure that all your doubts are clarified.

Step 3: stay hydrated
For a usual job interview, your attire, body language, and facial expressions help create an impact on the interviewer. But on a phone interview, you only have your voice and intonations to strike an impression. To make sure that you succeed at doing so, the most basic thing to do is stay hydrated. Have a glass of water before the expected time of the phone call. By doing so, your voice will sound clear and you will be able to articulate your thoughts well. Having water will also calm down your nerves.

6 Tips To Ace Your Phone Interview

Step 4: keep your documents in front of you
The HR of the company you have applied to might have already asked for your documents and CV through email. These documents will also be presented to your interviewer. Based on this, he will ask you questions. To help you answer these questions smoothly, keep a copy of all these documents in front of your throughout the interview.

Step 5: pick a spot for your phone interview
To make sure that the interviewer’s questions are audible during the interview, pick a quiet spot. This spot must be such that it’s devoid of external disturbances and has excellent cell phone reception. Preferably, this place can be a part of your home which you are well accustomed to. Make sure that none of the musical devices in the house are on and close the doors and windows to avoid further disturbances.

Step 6: smile, even if it’s not visible
A number of psychological studies have proven that a smile can have a positive effect on the person you are interacting with. But is it applicable to a telephonic conversation as well? Absolutely. If you smile while talking, the person at the other end of the phone call can recognize the smile in your voice. This will work in your favor. And also make sure you are calm. Be confident and you will nail the phone interview with some simple tips!

Telephone interviews can be tricky since all you have to rely on is the voice of the person on the other end. And, because of that, you cannot afford to make mistakes, if you do make one, it might be forgiven but too many of them can will lead to failure of a second interview and ultimately the job.

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When Hiring Employees Avoid These Blunders

August 1st, 2017 | Posted by ATS in Artificial Intelligence | HR | Recruitment - (Comments Off on When Hiring Employees Avoid These Blunders)

Hiring employees takes a certain type of skill that not many people possess. Some individuals can spot talent immediately, while others rely on recruitment software to help them choose the right candidate.  But does this mean that the hiring process can be subjective? In many ways, yes it is.  When you consider the many variables that must be taken into account when selecting candidates (personal biases being one of the biggest) it’s unlikely that the person doing the hiring will not be affected by his/her personal views, and experience during the interview process.

In her article for ERE MEDIA Top 10 Hiring and Recruiting Blunders by Employers Robin Shea, cautions, that “employers’ recruiting and hiring processes are fraught with legal risks” especially, if you are not aware of the potential landmines that you could step on, while going through the process.

We rearranged the order of those blunders and made a list 5:

Failure to hire the best person for the job: It’s easier to say “thanks, but no thanks” to a bad candidate than to say “you’re fired” to a bad employee. Failures to hire are also generally easier to defend than decisions to fire. So try to put all that nepotism, favoritism, prejudice, and concern about “connections” aside, and choose the individual who seems to have the best education, experience, and ability to perform the job. You can even consider whether the candidate “plays well with others” if you want.

Recruiting or hiring employees using “coherent people profiles” assembled by aggregators like Spokeo:   Spokeo was fined $800,000 in 2012 by the Federal Trade Commission because it gathered all kinds of data about individuals — including race, ethnic background, religion, economic status, and age ranges — and sold the information to employers who used it in making recruiting and hiring decisions.

When Hiring Employees Avoid These Blunders

Use of pre-employment tests that don’t comply with the law: Of course, in the overwhelming majority of jobs, it is flat-out illegal to require a physical or psychological examination before a conditional offer of employment has been made. Other testing — for example, “personality” tests designed to measure honesty and work ethic, “intelligence” tests, or “skills” tests — may be all right, but be careful even with these.

Committing an EEO faux pas in the job interview: Have you ever done this or seen it being done? Asking female candidates (but not male) about their childbearing plans and day care arrangements. Asking minority candidates (but not “majority”) whether they have reliable transportation. Bragging about your “young, high-energy” workforce, which is generally recognized as “code” for age discrimination. Asking candidates about their physical health or fitness, or where they go to church. (Not even where they “worship”!) Telling sexual, racial, ethnic, or religious jokes in the interview.

Failure to involve Human Resources in the recruiting and hiring process: “Oh, but HR is such an obstacle!” Yes, and you should be grateful. Think of HR as your Jiminy Cricket: HR is trying to save you from potentially devastating class action lawsuits and expensive settlements of adverse impact/failure-to-hire claims.

It is hard to believe that some companies today, go through these blunders. It is equally naïve to believe they don’t. And as the process of hiring becomes more efficient, data-driven, and automated by AI and technology, companies need to be more vigilant in ensuring that they are keeping up with the workforce compliance in the jurisdiction in which they operate.

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